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    [[include component="history" page="page:Lydia Bennet" limit="10" ]][[include component="history" page="page:Lydia Bennet" limit="0" ]]Chapter

    Chapter
    1 Quotes
    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
    Related themes: Marriage, Class
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  4. page Lydia Bennet edited Chapter [[include component="history" page="page:Lydia Bennet" limit="…

    Chapter[[include component="history" page="page:Lydia Bennet" limit="10" ]][[include component="history" page="page:Lydia Bennet" limit="0" ]]Chapter 1 Quotes
    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
    Related themes: Marriage, Class
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  5. page Lydia Bennet edited Chapter 1 Quotes It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a g…

    Chapter 1 Quotes
    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
    Related themes: Marriage, Class
    Chapter 3 Quotes
    His character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again.
    Mentioned or related: Fitzwilliam Darcy
    Related themes: Pride, Prejudice
    Chapter 4 Quotes
    Oh! you are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see a fault in anybody. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in your life.
    Speaker: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Mentioned or related: Jane Bennet
    Related themes: Prejudice, Family
    Chapter 7 Quotes
    Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty ... But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes ... he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness.
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy
    Related themes: Pride, Marriage, Class
    Chapter 15 Quotes
    Having now a good house and a very sufficient income, [Mr. Collins] intended to marry ... he meant to choose one of the daughters, if he found them as handsome and amiable as they were represented by common report. This was his plan of amends—of atonement—for inheriting their father's estate; and he thought it an excellent one, full of eligibility and suitableness, and excessively generous and disinterested on his own part.
    Mentioned or related: Mr. Collins
    Related themes: Marriage, Class
    Chapter 16 Quotes
    When Mr. Wickham walked into the room, Elizabeth felt that she had neither been seeing him before, nor thinking of him since, with the smallest degree of unreasonable admiration. The officers of the —shire were in general a very creditable, gentlemanlike set, and the best of them were of the present party; but Mr. Wickham was as far beyond them all in person, countenance, air, and walk.
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, George Wickham
    Related themes: Prejudice
    Chapter 19 Quotes
    Your portion is unhappily so small that it will in all likelihood undo the effects of your loveliness and amiable qualifications. As I must therefore conclude that you are not serious in your rejection of me, I shall choose to attribute it to your wish of increasing my love by suspense, according to the usual practice of elegant females.
    Speaker: Mr. Collins
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Related themes: Marriage, Class
    Chapter 22 Quotes
    Mr. Collins, to be sure, was neither sensible nor agreeable; his society was irksome, and his attachment to her must be imaginary. But still he would be her husband. Without thinking highly either of men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.
    Mentioned or related: Mr. Collins
    Related themes: Marriage, Class
    Chapter 29 Quotes
    Her air was not conciliating, nor was her manner of receiving them such as to make her visitors forget their inferior rank. She was not rendered formidable by silence; but whatever she said was spoken in so authoritative a tone, as marked her self-importance
    Mentioned or related: Lady Catherine de Bourgh
    Related themes: Pride, Class
    Chapter 33 Quotes
    If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer. He had ruined for a while every hope of happiness for the most affectionate, generous heart in the world; and no one could say how lasting an evil he might have inflicted.
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy, Jane Bennet
    Related themes: Pride, Prejudice, Family, Marriage
    Chapter 34 Quotes
    "In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you." ... He spoke well; but there were feelings besides those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the subject of tenderness than of pride. His sense of her inferiority—of its being a degradation—of the family obstacles which had always opposed to inclination, were dwelt on with a warmth which seemed due to the consequence he was wounding
    Speaker: Fitzwilliam Darcy
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Related themes: Pride, Marriage, Class
    Chapter 36 Quotes
    I, who have prided myself on my discernment!—I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable mistrust.—How humiliating is this discovery!—Yet, how just a humiliation! ... Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our acquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment, I never knew myself.
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy, George Wickham
    Related themes: Pride, Prejudice
    Chapter 40 Quotes
    There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.
    Speaker: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Mentioned or related: Fitzwilliam Darcy, George Wickham
    Related themes: Prejudice
    Chapter 41 Quotes
    Our importance, our respectability in the world must be affected by the wild volatility, the assurance and disdain of all restraint which mark Lydia's character. Excuse me—for I must speak plainly. If you, my dear father, will not take the trouble of checking her exuberant spirits, and of teaching her that her present pursuits are not to be the business of her life, she will soon be beyond the reach of amendment.
    Speaker: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Mentioned or related: Lydia Bennet, Mr. Bennet
    Related themes: Prejudice, Family
    Chapter 43 Quotes
    Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy
    Related themes: Marriage, Class
    Chapter 44 Quotes
    When she saw him thus seeking the acquaintance and courting the good opinion of people with whom any intercourse a few months ago would have been a disgrace—when she saw him thus civil, not only to herself, but to the very relations whom he had openly disdained ... the difference, the change was so great, and struck so forcibly on her mind, that she could hardly restrain her astonishment from being visible.
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy
    Related themes: Pride, Prejudice, Marriage, Class
    Chapter 47 Quotes
    Unhappy as the event must be for Lydia, we may draw from it this useful lesson: that loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behaviour towards the undeserving of the other sex.
    Speaker: Mary Bennet
    Mentioned or related: Lydia Bennet
    Related themes: Family, Marriage
    Chapter 48 Quotes
    The death of your daughter would have been a blessing in comparison of this ... They agree with me in apprehending that this false step in one daughter will be injurious to the fortunes of all the others; for who, as Lady Catherine herself condescendingly says, will connect themselves with such a family?
    Speaker: Mr. Collins
    Mentioned or related: Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Lydia Bennet, Mr. Bennet
    Related themes: Pride, Prejudice, Family, Marriage, Class
    Chapter 49 Quotes
    It is all very right; who should do it but her own uncle? If he had not had a family of his own, I and my children must have had all his money, you know; and it is the first time we have ever had anything from him, except a few presents. Well! I am so happy! In a short time I shall have a daughter married. Mrs. Wickham! How well it sounds!
    Speaker: Mrs. Bennet
    Mentioned or related: George Wickham, Lydia Bennet, Mr. Gardiner
    Related themes: Family, Marriage
    Chapter 52 Quotes
    They owed the restoration of Lydia, her character, every thing, to him. Oh! how heartily did she grieve over every ungracious sensation she had ever encouraged, every saucy speech she had ever directed towards him. For herself she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour, he had been able to get the better of himself.
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy, Lydia Bennet
    Related themes: Pride, Prejudice, Class
    Chapter 55 Quotes
    in spite of his being a lover, Elizabeth really believed all his expectations of felicity to be rationally founded, because they had for basis the excellent understanding, and super-excellent disposition of Jane, and a general similarity of feeling and taste between her and himself.
    Mentioned or related: Charles Bingley, Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Jane Bennet
    Related themes: Family, Marriage
    Chapter 56 Quotes
    I have said no such thing. I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.
    Speaker: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Mentioned or related: Lady Catherine de Bourgh
    Related themes: Pride, Marriage, Class
    Chapter 57 Quotes
    That is what makes it amusing. Had they fixed on any other man it would have been nothing; but hisperfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd!
    Speaker: Mr. Bennet
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy
    Related themes: Prejudice
    Chapter 58 Quotes
    What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.
    Speaker: Fitzwilliam Darcy
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Related themes: Pride, Marriage
    Chapter 59 Quotes
    I know that you could be neither happy nor respectable, unless you truly esteemed your husband; unless you looked up to him as a superior. Your lively talents would place you in the greatest danger in an unequal marriage ... My child, let me not have the grief of seeing you unable to respect your partner in life.
    Speaker: Mr. Bennet
    Mentioned or related: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Related themes: Pride, Prejudice, Family, Marriage
    Chapter 60 Quotes
    The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention. You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking, and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.
    Speaker: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
    Mentioned or related: Fitzwilliam Darcy
    Related themes: Prejudice, Marriage

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  6. tag_del Lydia Bennet untagged lydia
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  7. page Lydia Bennet edited Analysis of Lydia Bennet {http://i529.photobucket.com/albums/dd340/ChloeLaurene/Jane%20Austen%20C…
    Analysis of Lydia Bennet
    {http://i529.photobucket.com/albums/dd340/ChloeLaurene/Jane%20Austen%20Characters/LydiaBennet_2.jpg} Lydia Bennet
    Amanda Singleton
    Emilie Chesler
    Chapters 1-23

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  8. page Lydia Bennet edited Analysis Analysis of Lydia {http://i529.photobucket.com/albums/dd340/ChloeLaurene/Jane%20Aus…

    Analysis
    Analysis of Lydia
    {http://i529.photobucket.com/albums/dd340/ChloeLaurene/Jane%20Austen%20Characters/LydiaBennet_2.jpg} Lydia Bennet
    Amanda Singleton
    Emilie Chesler
    Chapters 1-23
    Key passages from the reading that define the character of Lydia Bennet
    1. (Mr. Bennet) "From all that I can collect from your manner of talking, you must be two of the silliest girls in the country." (Chapter 7 pg 36)
    From this quote we can gather that Mr. Bennet (Lydia's father) finds Lydia to be the type of girl that has no ambition but is rather "silly" and more concerned with daydreams and boys to care for sense and reality.
    2. "To Catherine and Lydia neither the letter nor it's writer were in any degree interesting. It was next to impossible that their cousin would come in a red coat and it was now some weeks since that they had received pleasure from the society of a man in any other color." (Chapter 12 pg 65)
    This passage refelects Lydia's character in that she is shallow and more self-centered, as cares more about seeing young bachelor soldiers from the war than to listen to the letter sent by their own cousin.
    3. "Lydia was a stout, well-grown girl of fifteen, with a fine complexion and good-humored countenance...she had high animal spirits and a sort of natural self-consequence which the attention of the officers...had increased into assurance." (Chapter 15 pg 50)
    Lydia's outward appearence is described here as well as some of her personality, which adds to her character of being the attention seeker. It seems as if the positive traits listed are how Lydia's demeanor would be used to sound appealing for the time period.
    4. (Mr. Collins to Lydia after wing interrupted while reading) "I have often observed how little young ladies are interested by books of a serious stamp, though solely written for their benefit. It amazes me, I confess; for certainly there can be nothing so advantageous to them as instruction. But I will no longer importune my young cousin" (Chapter 15 pg 69)
    Lydia is the quite the opposite of her sister Elizabeth in that she can hardly stand sitting down and listening to an intellectual story for
    more than 5 seconds. Mr. Collins is quite offended when Lydia (acting in her usual blatant behavior) interrupts him and he makes the point of saying how women should be more concerned about becoming knowlegable instead of meerly caring about finding a handsome and wealthy husband, an idea that Lydia, quite frankly, chooses to ignore.
    5. "At first there seemed a danger of Lydia's engrossing him entirely, for she was a most determined talker, but being likewise extremely fond of lottery tickets, she soon grew too much interested in the game, too eager in making bets and exclaiming after prizes, to have attention for anyone in particular." (Chapter 16 pg 76)
    This passage expresses Lydia's constant need to be the center of attention and her talkative nature among people she's eager to please. However, it also shows that her boisterous attitude is only used for her advantage and when something more fun or entertaining comes her way she will simply move on to the next thing. She enjoys living simply for entertainment.
    Stereotype of Lydia Bennet
    Lydia Bennet falls into the category of a ditsy boy-obessed teen stereotype. She is often depicted as silly and has no intrest in books or learning and is much more focused on finding a future husband. Lydia also is very chatty and self-centered, caring more about gossip, games, and gentlemen, than any knowledge.
    Austin's view on this stereotype
    Austin uses this stereotype in the character of Lydia to contrast the typical woman of the time period in the sense that women were supposed to be docile and well-mannered in the era and Lydia is often an outspoken and reckless character. Although she is not as revolutionary as her sister Elizabeth, as she still falls into the shadow of the average woman of the time. This is because she still cares greatly about marrying a wealthy and handsome man and impresssing people at parties and other gatherings and is not an independent woman.
    Sociogram
    Lydia Bennet
    Part 1 Chapters 1-23
    Lydia Bennet
    Part 2 Chapters 24-41
    Lydia Bennet
    Part 3 Chapters 42-end
    Catherine Bennet
    -both girls are very gossipy together
    showing their teenage girl side of them and
    how they are immature
    -the two girls seem to be together since they are the youngest
    -within this reading Lydia is seen and talking to Catherine most of the time.
    -both girls love to gossip and talk about the soldiers that are within town
    -youngest so both stuck at home
    -Catherine is distraught that Lydia gets to follow the soldiers in the summer.
    -Is represented as a bad example for her sister Catherine
    -
    Mary Bennet
    Charlotte Lucas
    Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner
    -find Lydia to be foolish, but help her anyway with her marriage to Wickham in order to save families reputation
    Lady Catherine de Bourgh
    Miss Bingley
    Mr. Collins
    -Feels offended by Lydia, finds her
    not lady like.
    -Lydia doesn't agree with his ideas of wanting to
    gain knowledge, but would rather just find a
    good husband. Thus interupts him when he is speaking.
    George Wickham
    -He is the man that Lydia is looking for, good looking, wealthy and very handsome.
    -Lydia quickly likes him
    -Lydia knows that Wickham doesn't like Miss King anymore
    -Says so in a satisfied way.
    -Lydia and Wickham run away together to get married
    -Wickham doesn't really love Lydia and is only marrying her for the money that he will get out of it
    -Lydia is marrying Wickham for the comfort, the money, and the fact that he was a single man giving her the opprotunity to marry.
    Mrs. Bennet
    -Both are like eachother because they
    both are worried mostly on marriage
    and finding handsome husbands.
    -Mother sees nothing wrong with her
    behavior and encourages her
    -Mrs. Bennet is excited that Lydia is getting married and encourages her daughters decision
    -However, Mrs Bennet knows that they will lose money from this arrangment but finds nothing wrong with it because reputation is more important
    Mr. Bennet
    -Finds his daughter to be silly, young, or imature
    -Worried about her and where she will end up
    -Goes searching for Lydia when he was told of the wedding, shows he does care about his daughter
    -However, when it comes down to it he is willing to pay to keep Lydia with Wickham, knowing he doesn't love his daughter, all for the sake of reputation.
    Charles Bingley
    Jane Bennet
    -To Jane, shows how important marriage is to her by saying, "Lord, how ashamed should be of not being married before three and twenty!"
    -just like Elizabeth, Jane doesn't get much respect from Lydia when she comes back home.
    -Lydia is more concerned about the latest gossip more.
    -is first to tell of Lydia's marriage
    -horrified by Sister's decsion
    Fitzwilliam Darcy
    -Doesn't really care for Lydia except fort the reason that she is Elizabeth's sister. That is why he gave Wickham the money inorder to stay with Lydia
    Elizabeth Bennet
    -Very worried where the way she acts will lead her
    - thinks they way she acts is childish and too flirty
    -within this reading Lydia does not spend much time with Elizabeth since she is out of town and even when Elizabeth comes back Lydia is just gossiping.
    -Elizabeth is worried about Lydia at first when hearing of the wedding,but then realizes how big of an impact it can make on their family
    -Doesn't want to see her sister get hurt however
    Key passages that express the Neoclassic characteristics of Lydia Bennet in the reading
    Lydia Bennet expresses Neoclassic characteristics from her wanting to have a plan, and her wanting to organized in her plans with her marriage. She plans to marry a handsome wealthy man and very soon. This can be shown from the quote, "Lord, how ashamed should be of not being married before three and twenty!" Austen uses the novel to satirize her society's view of a woman's role during the time period (late 1700s). Mrs. Bennet is the stereotypical lower aristocratic woman of the era. She is most concerned about making the best match for her daughters, feels that she has nothing else to worry about but seeing her daughters married, and relies upon her husband for all needs. Lydia falls into this category as well. She wants to marry for love, but she also sees her society for what it is and realizes that she might have to marry for position. She is very flirty and is looking for the handsome wealthy man she will love.
    Chapters 24-41
    Key passages from the reading that define the character of Lydia Bennet
    1. (Mrs. Gardiner) "Kitty and Lydia take his defection much more to heart than I do. They are young in the ways of the world and not yet open to the mortifying conviction that handsome young men must have something to live on, as well as the plain." (Chapter 26 pg 135)
    From this quote we can gather that Elizabeth knows her sisters well enough to find that Lydia has a tendency to expect all handsome and charming men to be perfect in all aspects of life and is shallow enough to believe that any flaws in a person is something to point out and look down upon.
    2. "Ay, that is just like your formality and discretion. You thought the waiter must not hear: as if her cared! I dare say her often hears worse things said than I am going to say. But her is an ugly fellow-I am glad he is gone: I never saw such a long ching in my life. Well, but now for my news, it is about dear Wickham; too good for the waiter, is it not? There is no danger of Wickham's marrying Mary King- there's for you! She is gone down to her uncle at Liverpool, gone to stay. Wickham is safe." (Chapter 39 pg 196)
    This passage refelects how opposite Lydia is from her sister Jane. Lydia doesn't look at all the good qualities of a person but rather points out and makes fun of their defects. She has a tendency to instantly speak her mind with no control over what she says and rambles on about whatever is entertaining her at the moment.
    3. "Wholly inattentive to her sister's feelings Lydia flew about the house in restless ecstasy, calling for everyone's congratulations, and laughing and talking with more violence than ever.." (Chapter 15 pg 50)
    Lydia's uncontrolled excitement at recieving an invitation clearly expresses her young and naive nature. She has very little of the demure personality that a proper woman of the time (1700s) would have and this is going to most likely be her in the future. The worst part of it is that she is so preoccupied with her own happiness that she flat out ignores her own sister's (Kitty) sensitivity to not also being invited.
    4. (Elizabeth) "Our importance, our respectablility in the world, must be affected by the wild volatility, the assurance and disdain of all restraint which mark Lydia's character. Excuse me, for I must speak plainly. If you, my dear father, will not take the trouble of checking her exuberant spirits, and of teaching her that her present pursuits are not to be the business of her life, she will soon be beyone the reach of amendment. Her character will be fixed; and she will, at sixteen, be the most determined flirt that ever made herself and her family riddiculous. A flirt, too, in the worst and meanest degree of flirtation; without any attraction beyond youth and a tolerable person; and, from the ignorance and emptiness which her rage for admiration will excite...vain, ignorant, idle and absolutely uncontrolled!" (Chapter 41 pg 205)
    This passage basically sums up all the negative parts of Lydia's character and what Elizabeth fears could easily be her sister's downfall. Lydia's ditsy and uncontrolled personality can only lead to her doing something that could shame the Bennet family forever or ruin everything they've always worked for. However, Elizabeth points out how this isn't something that is irreversable and it is up to Mr. Bennet to step in and stop Lydia from becomming a helpless and intolerable flrt.
    YES LET'S TALK ABOUT HER -- GREAT QUOTE AND WHY IS IT SOOO IMPORTANT THAT LIZZY IS SAYING IT???
    AFTER READING LETTER -- IGNORANT, IDLE, VAIN
    5. "In Lydia's imagination, a visit to Brighton comprised every possibility of earthly hapiness. She saw, with the creative eye of fancy, the streets of that gay bathing-place covered with officers. She saw herself the object of attention to tens and scores of them at present unknown. She saw all the glories of the camp-its tents and stretched forth in beauteous uniformity of lines, crowded with the young and the fay, and dazzling with scarlet; and, to complete the view, she saw herself seated beneath a tent, tenderly flirting with at least six officers at once." (Chapter 41 pg 205)
    This passage once again expresses Lydia's vanity and her utter desire to find a handsome husband as soon as possible. It also blatantly exposes the hopeless flirt within her, a quality that can lead to no good.
    Stereotype of Lydia Bennet
    Within this second reading, Lydia still has the same stereotype of ditsy-boy obsessed teenage girl. However she also has the stereotype of the spoiled baby of the family. After Lydia's sisters Elizabeth and Jane come home from being away for so long, all she can do is gossip about and wish she was with the soldiers. This shows how she is a ditsty-boy obsessed teenage girl. Also, Lydia wants nothing more than to follow the soldiers, and she does get invited to spend the summer in Brighton, which is where the soldiers are. Mr. and Mrs. Bennet allow her to go. This shows not only is she boy obsessed from wanting to follow the soldiers, but that she is some whate spoiled. Catherine was not allowed to spend the summer in Brighton, but Lydia is.
    Austin's view on this stereotype
    Austin uses these stereotypes just the same as the last section; to contrast the typical woman of the time period in the sense that women were supposed to be docile and well-mannered in the era and Lydia is often an outspoken and reckless character. Austin to show the silly and immature aspects of people who are caught up with marrying quickly and are doing it for the wrong reasons.
    Key passages that express the Neoclassic characteristics of Lydia Bennet in the reading
    Once again Lydia Bennet fufills her role as an extreme image of satire towards the typical Neoclassical woman. The first Neoclassical trait is the stressing of order, logic, and restraint of emotions, all three qualities of which Lydia is the complete opposite. Lydia is quite unrestrained, almost instantly speaks her mind and true emotions and "seldom listened to anyone for more than half a minute" (Austen-pg 198).
    =
    Chapters 42-61
    Key passages from the reading that define the character of Lydia Bennet
    1. (Elizabeth) "She had never percieved, while the regiment was in Hertfordshire that Lydia had any partiality for him; but she was convinced that Lydia wanted only encouragement to attach herself to anybody. Sometimes one officer, sometimes another, had been her favorite, as their attentions raised them in her opinion. Her affections had been continually fluctuatng but never without an object. The mischief of neglect and mistaken indulgence toward such a girl-oh, how acutely did she now feel it" (page 238 chapter 46)
    This passage ecpresses Elizabeth's explaination of Lydia and Wickham's relationship. She finds that Lydia does not really care for Wickham but rather only wanted somebody-anybody-to be attached to.
    2. (Elizabeth) "But can you think that Lydia is so lost to everything but love of him, as to consent to live with him on any terms other than marriage?...It does seem, and it is most shocking indeed...that a sisters sense of decency and virtue in such appoint should admit of doubt. But, really, I know not what to say. Perhaps I am not doing her justice but she is very young; she has never been taught to think on serious subjects; and for the last half year, nay, for a twelvemonth, she has been given up to nothing but amusement and vanity. She has been allowed to dispose of her time in the most idle and friviolous manner, and to adopt any opinions that came in her way. Since the-shire were first quartered at Maryton nothing but love, flirtation, and officers have been in her head. She has been doing everything in her power by thinking and talking on the subject, to give greater-what shall I call it?-susceptibility to her feelings; which are naturally lively enough." (page 240 chapter 47)
    This quote thouroughly portrays the opinions Elizabeth has on her sister and the reasons she believes were the cause of her running away with Wickham. Lydia is definitely young and her downfall came in the fact that she is too flirtatious and lively for her own good. Elizabeth mentions how she was never taught to think on serious subjects, which places the blame mostly on Mr. and Mrs. Bennet for how they raised (or rather didn't raise) their daughter.
    3. (Mary) "Unhappy as the event must be for Lydia, we may draw from it this useful lesson-that lost of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behavior toward the underserving of the other sex." (pg 244 chapter 47)
    Mary's short dialogue here greatly summarizes the entire essence and purpose behind the character of Lydia. She was meant to be an example of how once a woman loses virtue it can never be reclaimed, and this is one of the messages that Austen attempts to portray through the mistakes made by Lydia.
    DOES LYDIA UNDERSTAND ANYTHING THAT HAPPENED??? HER ROLE AS A STATIC CHARACTER
    FLAT OR ROUND
    Stereotype of Lydia Bennet
    Lydia still has the stereotype of ditsy-boy obsessed teen age girl. She is willing to give up the whole life she has known only to have that title as wife. She is very immature and willing to throw her life away for a boy she barely even knows. When Lydia runs away with Wickham, she is even seen as a bad example for her sister Kitty. However, when it comes down to it the relationship between Lydia and her husband compared to her sisters and their husbands, shows how rushed or fake love is really not right. Also, that just because the marriage makes sense it doesn’t mean that is right. Lydia however feels that since Wickham is willing to marry her she should just get married right away.
    Austin's view on this stereotype
    Austen plays off Lydia’s stereotype of the ditsy-boy obsessed teen age girl as the clown. Lydia throughout the whole book has gotten what she wanted, and now it includes “the perfect marriage.” However, Austen satirizes the whole situation because even though Lydia got what she wanted she ends up unhappy. Elizabeth ends up happy and in love with Darcy, Jane and Bingley end up together and happy, and even Kitty learned to become her own person and grew up. However, because of Lydia’s immature and selfish ways she ended up in an unhappy marriage. BACK TO TOP -- DOES SHE KNOW THAT???
    Key passages that express the Neoclassic characteristics of Lydia Bennet in the reading
    Once again Lydia Bennet can be seen as the most complete satire of the common woman of the Neoclassical Era. Her constant ambition towards finding a husband (something most women of the time were preoccupied with) ends up leading her to act impulsively and run away with Wickham, completely ignoring the shame of such an act (something that was almost unheard of and greatly frowned upon among women of the time). By attempting to become to model of a perfect Neoclassical woman she ends up losing all virtue she has, "that one false step involves her in endless ruin" and it is realized by her sisters that one's "reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful." (pg 244 chapter 47)
    Comparison to modern movie or book character
    One movie that relates to Lydia's part of the story is the movie "Mad Love." Within this movie it tells the story of two teenagers that run away and get married. However, when they are along their path of life they realize the bumps along the way. This is the same events that happen to Lydia and Wickham. At the end of the movie "Mad Love" the teenagers regret running away and ultimatly return home. With Lydia and Wickham, they end up realizing their marriage is wrong and end up regreting it just like the kids in the movie. Lydia and Wickham continually are looking towards their homes for help with money and other necessities, but they end up staying pushed away from their families unlike the movie.

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